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Posts for: December, 2017

Got gout? Holiday season triggers painful toes in Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg

Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg December 21, 2017 Got gout? If so, a Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg foot and ankle surgeon has a recommendation for surviving the holidays: Watch what you eat and drink.

Changes in diet, including overindulging in certain foods and beverages, can cause gout attacks this time of year, says Steven Gordon, DPM, FACFAS. Gordon is a member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) with offices in Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg

Gout attacks are extremely painful. They are caused when uric acid accumulates in the tissues or a joint and crystallizes. This most commonly occurs in the big toe joint. Gordon explains this is because the toe is the coolest part of the body and uric acid is sensitive to temperature changes.

He says foods that are high in purines contribute to uric acid build-up. He recommends that people prone to gout attacks avoid purine-rich items such as shellfish (shrimp, crab, etc.), organ meats (kidney, liver, etc.), red meat, red wine and beer.

Gout can be treated with medications, diet changes, increasing consumption of appropriate fluids, and immobilizing the foot. In some cases surgery is required to remove the uric acid crystals and repair the joint. For more information on gout, visit the ACFAS consumer Web site, FootHealthFacts.org, or contact Gordon’s office at 703-368-7166/ 703-437-6333 or Footva.com


By Reston Foot and Ankle Center
December 14, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunion  

Are you interested in finding the best methods for managing your bunion symptoms?bunions

Yikes! Bunion pain! Is there anything worse? Anything that makes it difficult to walk around without discomfort is sure to affect your day-to-day life. The goal of our Manassas, Leesburg and Reston, VA, podiatrists is to make sure that you have the knowledge that you need to manage your bunion symptoms effectively. If you aren’t sure how to handle this issue, we are here to help!

Wear the Right Footwear

If you have shoes that put too much pressure on your bunion or that bunch up your toes then you have to know that this will only make things worse. These shoes need to be tossed out and replaced with shoes that have little to no heel and offer a large, spacious area for your toes. If toes can wiggle around freely then this is a good sign that these shoes will also be good for your bunion.

Wear Custom Orthotics

Even if you find properly fitted footwear, sometimes you still need a little bit more support than what your shoes can offer. If this is the case then you may want to consider getting custom orthotics (shoe inserts) from our Manassas, Leesburg and Reston foot doctors. Custom orthotics are specially designed to fit your foot and its specific structural issues, which means that when you place them into your shoes they will distribute weight evenly so your bunion won’t take the brunt of walking around.

Do you have questions about handling your bunion symptoms? Is your bunion pain getting worse? If so, it might be time to turn to Reston Foot and Ankle Center. We offer three convenient locations in Reston, Manassas and Leesburg, VA, to serve you better.


Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg December 7, 2017 Parents and families can prevent cuts, puncture wounds and other injuries from going barefoot by following some simple recommendations from one Manassas, Reston and Leesburg foot and ankle surgeon.

 

            "Shoes are the best way to protect your family's feet from injuries," says Steven Gordon, DPM, FACFAS. "But if your summer just wouldn't be the same without kicking off your shoes or sandals, you can still make it a safe season."

 

            Dr. Gordon has offices in Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg. He offers these tips for a safer barefoot summer:

 

--See a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours for a puncture wound.

 

Why: These injuries can embed unsterile foreign objects deep inside the foot. A puncture wound must be cleaned properly and monitored throughout the healing process. This will help to avoid complications, such as tissue and bone infections or damage to tendons and muscles in the foot. Foot and ankle surgeons are trained to properly care for these injuries.

 

--Make sure you've been vaccinated against tetanus. Experts recommend teens and adults get a booster shot every 10 years.

 

Why: Cuts and puncture wounds from sharp objects can lead to infections and illnesses such as tetanus.

 

--Apply sunscreen to the tops and bottoms of your feet.

 

Why: Feet get sunburn too. According to FootHealthFacts.org, rare but deadly skin cancers can develop on the feet.

 

--Inspect your feet and your children's feet on a routine basis for skin problems such as warts, calluses, ingrown toenails and suspicious moles, spots or freckles.

 

Why: The earlier a skin condition is detected, the easier it is for your foot and ankle surgeon to treat it.

 

--Wear flip-flops or sandals around swimming pools, locker rooms and beaches.

 

Why: To avoid cuts and abrasions from rough anti-slip surfaces and sharp objects hidden beneath sandy beaches, and to prevent contact with bacteria and viruses that can cause athlete's foot, plantar warts, and other problems.

 

--Use common sense.

 

Why: Every year, people lose toes while mowing the lawn barefoot. Others suffer serious burns from accidentally stepping on stray campfire coals or fireworks. Murky rivers, lakes and ponds can conceal sharp objects underwater. People with diabetes should never go barefoot, even indoors, because their nervous system may not "feel" an injury and their circulatory system will struggle to heal breaks in the skin.

 

Gordon is a member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). He is board Certified in podiatric surgery He earned his podiatric medical degree from Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine and has been practicing in Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg since1995. Gordon can be contacted at 703-367-7166 or 703-437-6333

 

            For more information on puncture wounds, plantar warts, diabetic foot care and other topics, visit the ACFAS Web site, FootHealthFacts.org.