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Posts for: September, 2017

Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg, September 29, 2017-- Soccer season is in full swing and a local foot and ankle surgeon strongly urges parents and coaches to think twice before coaxing young, injury-prone soccer players to “play through” foot and ankle pain.

“Skeletally immature kids, starting and stopping and moving side to side on cleats that are little more than moccasins with spikes – that’s a recipe for foot and ankle sprains and worse,” cautions Steven Gordon, a member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.

“Kids will play with lingering, nagging heel pain that, upon testing, turns out to be a stress fracture that neither they, their parents nor their coaches were aware of,” He said. “By playing with pain, they can’t give their team 100 percent and make their injuries worse, which prolongs their time out of soccer.”

Gordon said he has actually had to show parents x-rays of fractures before they’ll take their kids out of the game. “And stress fractures can be subtle – they don’t always show up on initial x-rays.”

Symptoms of stress fractures include pain during normal activity and when touching the area, and swelling without bruising. Treatment usually involves rest and sometimes casting. Some stress fractures heal poorly and often require surgery, such as a break in the elongated bone near the little toe, known as a Jones fracture.

“Soccer is a very popular sport in our community, but the constant running associated with it places excessive stress on a developing foot,” Gordon said. He added that pain from overuse usually stems from inflammation, such as around the growth plate of the heel bone, more so than a stress fracture. “Their growth plates are still open and bones are still growing and maturing – until they’re about 13 to 16. Rest and, in some cases, immobilization of the foot should relieve that inflammation,” Gordon said.

Other types of overuse injuries are Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis (heel pain caused by inflammation of the tissue extending from the heel to the toes).

Quick, out-of-nowhere ankle sprains are also common to soccer. “Ankle sprains should be evaluated by a physician to assess the extent of the injury,” said Gordon. “If the ankle stays swollen for days and is painful to walk or even stand on, it could be a fracture."

Collisions between soccer players take their toll on toes. “When two feet are coming at the ball simultaneously, that ball turns into cement block and goes nowhere. The weakest point in that transaction is usually a foot, with broken toes the outcome,” he/she explained. “The toes swell up so much the player can’t get a shoe on, which is a good sign for young athletes and their parents: If they are having trouble just getting a shoe on, they shouldn’t play.”

For further information about various foot conditions, contact Dr. Gordon at 703-368-7166 or visit FootHealthFacts.org, sponsored by the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.


By Reston, Manassas and Leesburg Foot and Ankle Center
September 13, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: foot problems  

Even minor foot problems can limit your ability to walk, run or even climb a flight of stairs. The podiatrists at Reston, Manassas and foot problemsLeesburg Foot and Ankle Centers discuss several common foot conditions and explain treatment options.

Ingrown toenails

Is the side of your toe sore and red? You may have an ingrown toenail. This condition occurs when an edge of your toenail grows into the side of the skin surrounding your toenail. If you notice the problem soon enough, you may be able to release the trapped edge by soaking your toe in warm water, then placing a small piece of cotton under the nail. When your nail can't be freed, or it becomes infected, you'll need to visit our Reston, Manassas or Leesburg offices for treatment. After your toe is numbed with an anesthetic, we'll perform a minor procedure to remove the trapped edge.

Arthritis

Both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis can cause pain and make walking difficult. Over-the-counter pain medications and ice can reduce swelling and pain, but sometimes home treatment doesn't quite dull the pain of arthritis. Foot doctors can recommend a variety of treatment options, depending on the severity of your condition. Cortisone injections can temporarily relieve pain and inflammation,  while prescription orthotics reposition your foot and decrease pressure on your painful joints. In severe cases, surgery to remove loose cartilage or fuse joints may be necessary.

Plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the tough band of tissue in the sole of your foot becomes inflamed, causing heel pain. If over-the-counter pain medications aren't helpful, you may benefit from cortisone injections, physical therapy, night splints or custom orthotics. Surgery isn't needed in most cases, although it may be a viable option in severe cases.

Bunions

A bunion is a painful bump at the base of your big toe due to a misalignment of the bones in your feet. They're genetic, but particularly painful in women who frequently wear high heels. Orthotics, cushioning pads, splints and cortisone injections can reduce the pain, but they won't get rid of your bunion. Surgery to realign your bones is the only way to correct the bunion if it is causing pain or difficulty wearing shoes.

Tired of living with foot pain? Schedule an appointment with the podiatrists at Reston, Manassas or Leesburg Foot and Ankle Center by calling (703) 437-6333 for the Reston office, (703) 368-7166 for the Manassas office and (703) 777-2101 for the Leesburg office.