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Taking a vacation? Make it easy on your feet

(Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg, VA – 7/20/2018) Although rest and relaxation are the goals for most vacations, they usually involve a lot of walking and a lot of walking usually involves sore feet.

"Walking is great exercise and one of the most reliable forms of transportation," says Shaun Hafner, DPM, FACFAS, a foot and ankle surgeon with offices in Northern Virginia. "But if your feet aren’t in the best shape or you don’t have the right shoes, too much walking can cause foot problems."

According to Dr. Hafner, good foot care is essential if you plan to subject your feet to long periods of walking. Some simple foot care tips include:

  • Wear thick, absorbent socks (acrylic instead of cotton).
  • Dry feet thoroughly after bathing, making sure to dry between toes. Use powder before putting on shoes.
  • Nails should be cut regularly, straight across the toe.
  • Bunions, hammertoes or any other serious foot problems should be evaluated by a foot and ankle surgeon.

"The right shoe is also important to healthy walking," say Dr. Hafner. "The ideal walking shoe should be stable from side to side, and well-cushioned, and it should enable you to walk smoothly. Many running shoes will fit the bill."

He adds there are also shoes made especially for walking. Walking shoes tend to be slightly less cushioned, yet not as bulky, and lighter than running shoes. Whether a walking or running shoe, the shoes need to feel stable and comfortable.

Warming up exercises to help alleviate any muscle stiffness or pulled muscles are also advised before walking. Loosening up the heel cords (Achilles and calf) and thigh muscles before a walk is especially effective.

"If you’re not accustomed to long walks, start slowly and rest if your feet start hurting," says Dr. Shaun Hafner. "And above all, have fun."

Reston, Manassas, Leesburg, Virginia 7/20/18 Although rest and relaxation are the goals for most vacations, they usually involve a lot of walking and a lot of walking usually involves sore feet.

"Walking is great exercise and one of the most reliable forms of transportation," says Steven Gordon,DPM FACFAS, a foot and ankle surgeon with offices in Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg, "But if your feet aren’t in the best shape or you don’t have the right shoes, too much walking can cause foot problems."

According to Gordon, good foot care is essential if you plan to subject your feet to long periods of walking. Some simple foot care tips include:

  • Wear thick, absorbent socks (acrylic instead of cotton).
  • Dry feet thoroughly after bathing, making sure to dry between toes. Use powder before putting on shoes.
  • Nails should be cut regularly, straight across the toe.
  • Bunions, hammertoes or any other serious foot problems should be evaluated by a foot and ankle surgeon.

"The right shoe is also important to healthy walking," say Gordon. "The ideal walking shoe should be stable from side to side, and well-cushioned, and it should enable you to walk smoothly. Many running shoes will fit the bill."

He adds there are also shoes made especially for walking. Walking shoes tend to be slightly less cushioned, yet not as bulky, and lighter than running shoes. Whether a walking or running shoe, the shoes need to feel stable and comfortable.

Warming up exercises to help alleviate any muscle stiffness or pulled muscles are also advised before walking. Loosening up the heel cords (Achilles and calf) and thigh muscles before a walk is especially effective.

"If you’re not accustomed to long walks, start slowly and rest if your feet start hurting," says Gordon. "And above all, have fun."

Contact Gordon's office at 703-437-6333 for more information. Gordon is a member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). Their consumer Web site, FootHealthFacts.org, provides reliable information on foot and ankle conditions.

Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg, Virginia – July 5, 2018 As millions of Americans hit the beach this summer, Steven Gordon DPM, FACFAS, a foot and ankle surgeon in Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg, Virginia, shares these safety tips from the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.

Puncture wounds and cuts: Wear shoes to protect your feet from puncture wounds and cuts caused by sea shells, broken glass and other sharp objects. Don’t go in the water if your skin gets cut – bacteria in oceans and lakes can cause infection. To avoid complications from a puncture wound, see a foot and ankle surgeon for treatment within 24 hours.

Jellyfish stings: Remember that a jellyfish washed up on the beach can still sting if you step on it. If their tentacles stick to the foot or ankle, remove them, but protect your hands from getting stung too. Vinegar, meat tenderizer or baking soda reduce pain and swelling. Most jellyfish stings heal within days, but if they don’t, medical treatment is required.

Sunburns: Feet get sunburn too. Rare but deadly skin cancers can occur on the foot. Don’t forget to apply sunscreen to the tops and bottoms of your feet.

Burns: Sand, sidewalks and paved surfaces get hot in the summer sun. Wear shoes to protect your soles from getting burned, especially if you have diabetes.

Ankle injuries, arch and heel pain: Walking, jogging and playing sports on soft, uneven surfaces like sand frequently leads to arch pain, heel pain, ankle sprains and other injuries. Athletic shoes provide the heel cushioning and arch support that flip-flops and sandals lack. If injuries occur, use rest, ice, compression and elevation to ease pain and swelling. Any injury that does not resolve within a few days should be examined by a foot and ankle surgeon.

Diabetes risks: The 20 million Americans with diabetes face serious foot safety risks at the beach. The disease causes poor blood circulation and numbness in the feet. A diabetic may not feel pain from a cut, puncture wound or burn. Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. Diabetics should always wear shoes to the beach, and remove them regularly to check for foreign objects like sand and shells that can cause sores, ulcers and infections.

For treatment of beach-related foot injuries, contact Dr. Gordon at 703-437-6333.

For more information on this and other foot and ankle health topics, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons’ consumer website FootHealthFacts.org.

Doctor urges sunscreen use and exams to prevent skin cancer on feet

 

 

Reston, Manassas, Leesburg, Virginia  When at the pool or lake we all lather up with sun screen to protect our skin from the harmful rays of the sun. But do we remember to apply sunscreen to our feet?

 

Many don’t realize skin cancer can occur on the feet from unprotected sun exposure, and overlook applying sunscreen to the area. But, Steven Gordon DPM, AACFAS warns skin cancer of the foot is prevalent and can even be fatal if not caught early.

 

While all types of skin cancer, including squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma, can be found on the foot, the most common is the most serious form, melanoma. Symptoms can be as subtle as an abnormal-looking mole or freckle found anywhere on the foot, and often go unnoticed without routine foot exams.

 

According to foot and ankle surgeon Dr. Gordon early diagnosis is key to effective treatment for the condition. But because people aren’t looking for the early warning signs or taking the same precautions they do for other areas of the body, often times skin cancer in this region is not diagnosed until later stages.

 

 

“I advise my patients to regularly inspect their feet, including the soles, in between their toes and even under their toenails, for any changing moles or spots and to have any suspicious areas promptly examined by a foot and ankle specialist,” Dr. Gordon explains. 

 

 

For more information on skin cancer of the foot contact Dr. Gordon at 703-437-6333 or visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons’ Web site, FootHealthFacts.org.

 

 

Kick-start kids' summer with shoe-shopping tips for parents

When it comes to the health of your children, you do everything you can to help them grow up healthy and strong. You get them vaccinated, take them to the dentist and optometrist, and you do your best to ensure they eat a nutritious diet that will help them grow. But are you aware of the important role foot health plays in a child’s overall development?

“Every parent knows the frustration of trying to keep up with children who grow quickly, and that rapid pace of growth can mean children need new shoes and socks every few months,” says Steven Gordon, DPM, a podiatrist at Reston, Manassas, and Leesburg Foot and Ankle Centers and member of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). “With warm weather on the way, it’s a great time for parents to take a look at their children’s shoes to ensure they’re wearing footwear that will serve them well through the active days of summer.”

Ill-fitting footwear can irritate kids’ feet and aggravate existing conditions caused by injury, heredity, deformity, or illness. APMA offers parents guidance for keeping kids in shoes that fit properly and protect their feet:

  • Take the child with you while shoe shopping and have him or her try on the shoes. Every shoe fits differently, so even if you’re buying your child’s correct size, the shoe still may not be comfortable. Have the child try on footwear with the socks or tights you expect will be worn with the shoes.
  • Always measure a child’s foot before buying new shoes. Children’s feet grow so quickly that their shoe size can literally change from month to month.
  • Shop late in the afternoon when feet are largest, and make sure to fit the shoe to the larger foot. Everyone’s feet swell by the end of the day, and no one has feet that are exactly the same size. One will always be slightly larger.
  • Never buy shoes that are too large or need a “break-in” period. Shoes should be comfortable immediately. “Buying shoes for kids isn’t like buying a too-large coat that you know they’ll grow into,” Dr. Gordon says. “Shoes that are too big can irritate a child’s feet, and even lead to tripping or injury.”
  • Let kids have a say—within reason. “Of course parents will have to guide children toward good choices,” Dr. Gordon says. “But allowing kids to have a say in the shoe-buying process can help promote healthy foot habits down the road.”

Once your child takes the new shoes home, keep watch to ensure the shoes stay comfortable and in good shape. Examine the child’s feet at the end of the day for signs of irritation. If your child always wants to remove one or both of the shoes, it may mean the shoes are uncomfortable.

Finally, says Dr. Steven Gordon, “Never hand down footwear.”

“Just because a shoe size fits one child comfortably doesn’t mean it will fit another the same way,” he notes. “Plus, sharing shoes can spread fungi like athlete’s foot and nail fungus.”





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